Monday, June 29, 2015

BaltoZine Round-Up: July 2015

The Baltozine Roundup is a regular feature wherein we take a look at what national periodicals are saying about Baltimore-area arts, events, people, and places. Be sure to pick up the magazines and read the full articles.

In the July/August issue of Imbibe (#56), Joshua M. Bernstein's article, "So Metal: Once Knocked As A Novelty, Canned Craft Beer Is Growing Up," local brewer Stillwater's Yacht is listed as one of "Ten To Try:"
"With his Contemporary Works line, saison-driven gypsy brewer Brian Strumke is exploring different styles, such as this floral, grassy summer-friendly lager sold by the 16-ounce can."
The current issue of Razorcake (#86) has a review of Baltimore band Sick Thoughts' new 7-inch, "Beat on Beat" by Ty
Stranglehold:
"Holy shit, how many records has this guy put out in the last year or so? I know I can't keep up, no matter how hard I try. If you missed my review of the 10" a couple of issues ago, Sick Thoughts is  frapped out, lo-fi, punk rock destruction. I think I get a little bit of brain damage every time I listen to this band, but that ain't stopping me. Time to dummy up and flip the record again." 
And the new issue of The Big Take-Over (#76) has a bunch of reviews of Baltimore bands:

Chuck Foster reviews Half Japanese's Volume Two: 1987-1989:
"...a single massive deconstruction of blues, garage, psychedelic, and punk rock that continues the beatnik rants of The Fugs through the coke-bottle glasses of suburban life. ... Find out why their legendary status is will deserved." 

Dave Heaton reviews Dan Deacon's Gliss Riffer:
"... Glass [sic] reminds us there is humor and surprise in stuff like Steve Reich, while also taking us to the dancefloor to such an extent that we stop thinking and start moving."

Tucker Petertil reviews Lower Den's Escape From Evil:
"... Gone are the mellow sounds of yesteryear replaced with synthesizers and electronic rhythms. Hunter's vocals are set back in the mix and everything has a reverb glow about it, a glow matched by a dreamily Gothic heaviness... "

And, finally, Brian Swirsky reviews Sick Thoughts' Fat Kid With A 10-Inch 10":
"... Readers must go out and find any and all of Sick Thoughts' records, and you can this review as a basis for future quests. KBD-style punk for the modern age that will have you pogoing all over the room! ..." 

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